Posted in Lathe Machine Mechanical Engineering

Mounting a Work on Lathe Chuck (III)

Special-Purpose Chucks Centers and faceplates are the two basic ways of holding work on the lathe. They’ll cope with the majority of your turning requirements; indeed, you could turn for a lifetime using nothing more. There are times, however, when other chucking methods can make life easier. Special-purpose chucks can be invaluable for grabbing odd-shaped work, small work, and finished work that requires modification. In production work, a special purpose chuck can often speed things up considerably. Let’s look at the vast array of special-purpose chucks that you can buy or make yourself. With this information, you’ll be able to…

Posted in Lathe Machine Mechanical Engineering

Mounting a Work on Lathe Chuck (II)

Faceplates Faceplates are used to hold work that can’t be supported (or that you don’t want to be supported) by a tailstock. Since this situation encompasses most faceplate work, the type of turning has been named for the chucking method. As mentioned previously, however, it’s the orientation of the grain that makes it facework, not how the work is held. A faceplate is simply a metal disk with a threaded hub that screws onto the headstock spindle. Circles of holes around the periphery allow work to be fastened to the plate with screws. Most faceplates have a flat surface, but…

Posted in Lathe Machine Mechanical Engineering

Mounting a Work on Lathe Chuck (I)

Now that you have your lathe set up and running, it’s time to think about turning something. But first you need a way to hold the work in the lathe. I’ve always maintained that I can turn anything, if given a way to mount it in my lathe. This is where chucking comes in. Technically, a chuck is any device that holds work in the lathe. It can be a set of centers, a faceplate, an elaborately manufactured jawtype chuck, or a simple shop made glue block. Understanding the difference between spindle turning and faceplate turning is central to the…